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From SXSW Interactive

BY Jed Miller | Monday, March 14 2005

In Austin at SXSW, for a panel tomorrow on deliberative democracy and technology.

Yesterday, heard Jeffrey Veen make a great point on how technology can fuel post-conference follow-up. Blogs, he suggested, may be a better way to keep the conversation going than the traditional "Hey, let's start a listserv" exhortations (which, as we all know, work about as often as friendships after summer camp).

A networked (scattered?) collection of blog posts may have more penetration, more authenticity and maybe even more long-term effectiveness than listservs among a self-selected minority who start with good intentions but often lack the time - and even more often the project - to focus their work.

Today, on the Blogging While Black panel, the discussion has the momentum and vitality of something still rare and excited to recognize itself. Lynne Johnson is moderating with a highly-structured but really productive list of questions.

Also have to point out that the audience - and the conference attendance - looks to be about 85% white.

News Briefs

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In China, Local Governments Play Whac-a-Mole With Taxi Apps

It seems these days that car-hailing apps exist only to give cities grief. In New York, car sharing start-ups like Lyft ignore labor, safety insurance laws and in China, the situation is no different except in one regard: taxi hailing apps in China are proliferating at a faster rate than in the U.S. In China, however, the taxi system is very much in its infancy and local Chinese governments are struggling to control the proliferation of new apps that flout the law. GO

thursday >

The Uncertain Future of India's Plan to Biometrically Identify Everyone

Since its launch in 2010, people in India have raised a number of questions and concerns about the Aadhaar card —formally known as Unique Identification (UID)— citing its effects on privacy rights, potential security flaws, and failures in functionality. GO

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