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First POST: Command Lines

BY Micah L. Sifry | Wednesday, January 14 2015

The White House embraces community broadband; how facial recognition software is getting used to predict voting behavior; understanding how blockchain technology could change the world; and much, much more. Read More

Civic Hall Beta Member: Tim Karr, Free Press

BY Jessica McKenzie | Wednesday, January 14 2015

Tim Karr hanging out at Civic Hall

This month Civic Hall, the new home for civic tech in New York City, opened its doors to beta members like Tim Karr, of Free Press. Beta members are people working in the civic tech space who have been invited to try out Civic Hall for the month of January: to work in the space and see what it is like, and in turn provide feedback to the Civic Hall team. We caught up with Karr to ask him about his work and find out what he hopes to see and do here at Civic Hall. Read More

First POST: Turbulence

BY Micah L. Sifry | Tuesday, January 13 2015

Why David Cameron's call to ban encrypted communications in the UK is stupid and unworkable; what "democracy in the digital age" might look like; the open data movement's turbulent teenage years in the US; and much, much more. Read More

Civic Tech and Engagement: How NationBuilder Helps Organizations Recruit and Mobilize

BY Eilis O'Neill | Tuesday, January 13 2015

I Am That Girl uses NationBuilder

NationBuilder officially launched in 2011, and, since then, it has grown from a start-up to a company that employs 70 people and from a beta platform to one used by over 1,000 organizations—from civic activists to gelato shops—to find new members, track their involvement, and then encourage them to meet in person. In 2014, NationBuilder’s customers used the platform to raise over $200 million and to recruit nearly 900,000 new volunteers.

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First POST: Clues

BY Micah L. Sifry | Friday, January 9 2015

Updating the Cluetrain Manifesto fifteen years later; how to battle online harassment; CityCamps this weekend; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Catch-ups

BY Micah L. Sifry | Monday, January 5 2015

How to be digitally competitive in the 2016 "invisible primary"; why net neutrality matters to the #BlackLivesMatter movement; how governments are winning the online censorship battle; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Cheers

BY Micah L. Sifry | Wednesday, December 24 2014

How to not overreact to the Sony hack; the FCC admits it lost nearly 680,000 open internet comments; a great civic app wish-list; and much, much more. Read More

Civic Hall is Open for Membership Applications!

BY Micah L. Sifry | Monday, December 22 2014

Civic Hall's entrance at 156 Fifth Ave, NYC

Civic Hall, our new collaborative community center for civic tech innovators will be opening in “beta” mode in late January. If you want to get in on Civic Hall's ground floor--well, literally we're on the second floor--send in your application now. Read More

First POST: Omens

BY Micah L. Sifry | Friday, December 5 2014

Turmoil at Chris Hughes' New Republic; why police cameras could help improve police behavior; why people put hashtags on signs at physical protests; and much, much more Read More

How Brigade is Taking Shape: An Interview with James Windon

BY Alex Howard | Tuesday, November 25 2014

James Windon speaking at Fusion Riseup 2014

The following is an edited transcript of an interview that Alex Howard conducted with James Windon, the president of civic engagement startup Brigade, last Wednesday November 19 at the Fusion RiseUp event in Washington, DC. That morning, Brigade had announced that it was partnering with a “carefully curated” set of organizations: Rainforest Action Network, Americans for Tax Reform, the Drug Policy Alliance, Represent.Us, Generation Opportunity, Forecast the Facts, FreedomWorks and Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America. With more than $9 million in venture funding from Napster co-founder Sean Parker, Brigade has been amassing a staff of more than 50 while remaining quiet about how it plans to launch and grow a new social network for civic engagement. In this interview, Windon explains why he thinks there’s still room for “yet another social network” and how Brigade will attract users: “one of the biggest reasons that people have stopped participating civically is because their civic lives have become decoupled from their social lives,” noting that the company will be primarily focused on people’s relationship to local issues and down-ballot representatives. He also addresses the inevitable questions about a for-profit business entering the civic space, saying,“our best bet at how we will monetize is through advertising.” Read More