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First POST: Welcome to the NBA

BY Micah L. Sifry | Thursday, January 16 2014

Reading the tea-leaves before President Obama's NSA reform speech Friday; Fred Wilson explains why the end of net neutrality spells bad news for tech start-ups; SayIt, a new tool for annotating public transcripts, launches; and much, much more. Read More

WeGov

LIVE BLOG: Abre Latam, an Unconference About a More Open Latin America

BY Susannah Vila | Monday, June 24 2013

This week, technologists, researchers, activists and public officials will meet up in Montevideo, Uruguay to talk about government transparency. To kick off the festivities, two leading open government not for profits in the region, Uruguay’s DATA and Chile’s Ciudadano Inteligente, are holding an unconference on open data called Abre Latam (Open Latam). The unconference is primarily focused on convening civil society, and is intended to complement the more government-oriented event, a regional conference on open data, that starts on Wednesday. Read More

WeGov

Succeeding Means Letting Go: A Response to David Eaves

BY Tom Steinberg | Thursday, July 26 2012

Responding to David Eaves, mySociety Director Tom Steinberg pulls the lid off of a project in the works: a new open-source component for civic hackers, built by Chile's Ciudadano Inteligente, that will fit into mySociety's new Components framework. "It's because we believe," Steinberg writes, "that the only way that the Components can really thrive beyond our organizations is if they are truly interoperable over the web, truly owned by different people, and if they can handle massively varying political and cultural contexts. It is our goal that in the future any of the Components being used to underpin a website or app can be out and replaced by a clone that speaks the same API, but which may be built by a different group, in a different language. Interoperability and flexibility are everything." Read More

WeGov

Culture Hacking: How One Project is Changing Transparency in Chile

BY David Eaves | Wednesday, May 16 2012

A few weeks after the launch of Inspector de Intereses — a Chilean website that allows citizens to map money trails in politics — the team at La Fundación Ciudadano Inteligente, the organization behind the site, had an interesting visitor. At the doorstep stood a member of parliament, carrying a stack of papers which outlined his interest in various corporations. He had received the team’s letter inviting him — and his colleagues — to update his records, and here he was, ready to do so, in person no less.

That eager senator wasn’t alone: about 20 percent of Chilean parliamentarians took the opportunity to update their records. In a country where conflicts of interest are not regularly discussed or acknowledged, this was an interesting shift, a change in culture and in process that was part of a Ciudadano Inteligente's strategy to make more transparent the link between money and power in Chile.

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New Website Lets Chileans Browse Their Lawmakers' Financial Ties, Reported and Otherwise

BY Nick Judd | Monday, October 24 2011

Inspectordeintereses.cl Over the weekend, Fundacíon Ciudadano Inteligente released Inspector de Intéreses, a site for Chilean citizens to explore possible conflicts of interest between their legislators and entities ... Read More