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First POST: Which Half a Glass?

BY Micah L. Sifry | Wednesday, February 12 2014

Was "The Day We Fight Back" a boom or a bust?; understanding how the NSA tracks people's physical locations; using Facebook to protest "Third World" schools in Los Angeles; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Fight Club

BY Micah L. Sifry | Tuesday, February 11 2014

More than 6,000 websites and organizations are "fighting back" against NSA mass surveillance today; Not included among them, Wikipedia, which was critical to the anti-SOPA/PIPA coalition; a new mobile app Secret seems in tune with the new privacy zeitgeist, or is it?, and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Interception

BY Micah L. Sifry | Monday, February 10 2014

First Look Media's "The Intercept" launches; Edward Snowden's reported use of a "web crawler" doesn't impress software engineers; the GOP is targeting coders to help them build their voter-targeting operation; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Realizations

BY Micah L. Sifry | Thursday, February 6 2014

Gearing up the data shops for the 2014 mid-term elections; Silicon Valley moguls want to unseat a Democratic incumbent; is Verizon already violating net neutrality?; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Vitam Et Bello

BY Micah L. Sifry | Wednesday, February 5 2014

The British government is reportedly using DDOS against Anonymous; the chair of the House Intelligence Committee seems to think professional journalism equals thievery; Syria's opposition activists are losing their Facebook pages; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Obscurity

BY Micah L. Sifry | Tuesday, February 4 2014

New "transparency" reports from major tech companies on government data requests; seeing secret surveillance satellites; ElectionMall's troubled history; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Lip Reading

BY Micah L. Sifry | Monday, February 3 2014

Journalism after Snowden; Canada's unfolding spying scandal; PopVox's bright future; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Oh, Canada

BY Micah L. Sifry | Friday, January 31 2014

Canada's NSA exposed copying its Big Brother to the south; a former TSA screener tells all about those full-body scanners; Salesforce's Marc Benioff pushes back against Silicon Valley's libertarians; and much, much more. Read More

What Swartz, Lessig, Assange & Snowden Have to Teach Us

BY Micah L. Sifry | Monday, January 27 2014

Is the lone hacker-whistleblower model of change working? (flickr: Meet the Media Guru/biatch0r/Robert Douglass/Doc Searls)

The following is the text of the remarks I made yesterday at "As Darkness Falls," an international conference that took place this past weekend in Berlin, which was focused on "Theory and Practice of Self-Empowerment in the Age of Digital Control." (People here are taking the NSA surveillance revelations very seriously.) One of my co-panelists was Jacob Applebaum, an independent hacker and security expert who works on Tor, whom I refer to as Jake at one point in my comments. Video of our full panel should be posted online soon. Read More

First POST: Bitcoin Agonistes

BY Micah L. Sifry | Wednesday, January 22 2014

Is Bitcoin going to change the world? One of the inventors of the web browser thinks so; Edward Snowden denies being a Russian puppet; the Ukrainian government geolocates protesters and sends them a scary SMS; and much, much more. Read More

News Briefs

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New Media Sites in Iran Blur Lines Between Citizen Journo, Professional Journo, & Activist

In 2010, Newsweek declared Iran the “birthplace of citizen journalism.” Iranian bloggers were hailed by Westerners as “brave” for their coverage of the aftermath of the disputed 2009 election. A 40-second video of the death of Neda Agha-Soltan during an anti-government protest won a prestigious George Polk Award, the first anonymously-produced work to be so honored. And then came the 2013 study “Whither Blogestan,” which sought to explain Iran's shrinking blogosphere. Of nearly 25,000 highly active and connected blogs in 2008 and 2009, only 20 percent were still online in September 2013.

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