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Foley-Busting Blogger Now Has Fred Thompson in His Sights

BY Colin Delany | Tuesday, August 21 2007

Remember Mark Foley, the congressmember with the bad habit of indulging in salacious IM sessions with underage House pages? Lane Hudson, the guy who helped bring Foley's political career to an end last Fall by posting ... Read More

Dems Behind "Gays for Giuliani?" Well, Duh

BY Colin Delany | Thursday, August 16 2007

Earlier today, Josh linked to a piece on the excellent website Spot-on that finds a Democratic connection to the "Gays for Giuliani" video that came out (hah!) last week. Specifically, author Scott Olin Schmidt points to ... Read More

Interesting List-Building Tactic in a Democratic Activist Email, With a Republican Online Game for a Chaser

BY Colin Delany | Thursday, August 16 2007

Just got an interesting email from the DNC asking me to...no, not to give money, but to send a thank-you note. (Paging Miss Manners...). Actually, it's a clever idea, since constant begging for donations can be a big ... Read More

Facebook Profile Reveals Guiliani's Daughter Supports Obama

BY Colin Delany | Monday, August 6 2007

Or, at least she did until this morning — shortly after a reporter contacted her, she pulled out of the Facebook group "Barack Obama (One Million Strong for Barack)." Slate has details; Caroline Giuliani and her ... Read More

Adam Nagourney’s Joe Trippi/John Edwards Puff Piece

BY Colin Delany | Thursday, August 2 2007

Beating up on Times political reporter Adam Nagourney is a hobby gleefully enjoyed in many corners of the Interweb, but now that he's ventured onto OUR turf, it's time for a quick barrage of jabs, hooks and vicious ... Read More

Candidates and Social Networks: Generation Gaps and "Unearned" Status

BY Colin Delany | Tuesday, July 31 2007

Some interesting conclusions in a preview of a study of presidential candidates and social networking sites to be released by two Bentley College (Mass.) professors in August. For instance, the authors note that the ... Read More

It Worked! Though Not a Revolution, The YouTube Debate Impressed

BY Colin Delany | Tuesday, July 24 2007

The YouTube debate may not have revolutionized politics, but it sure as hell was more of a pleasure to watch than your average political event. I'd read both hype and skepticism in the days beforehand, and I suspect that ... Read More

Romney's on The Tube, Obama Dominates Online, Rudy Loves Radio

BY Colin Delany | Wednesday, July 11 2007

Neilsen has published some fascinating details on how the presidential candidates are spending their media money and what kind of results they're getting for it. MarketingCharts.com has the numbers; here are some ... Read More

Will Google Radio Ads Be a Factor in the '08 Elections?

BY Colin Delany | Tuesday, July 10 2007

At last week's New Organizing Institute/IPDI-sponsored Google presentation on advocacy tools, after looking at Google Ads and answering questions about click fraud, the company's Elections and Issue Advocacy team touched ... Read More

Branding Supporters' Desktops: A Widget for Campaigns

BY Colin Delany | Friday, June 29 2007

Hi, I'd like to ask all of our Republican colleagues to go to the bathroom or go watch tv or something. Um, yeah, just kidding, but here's why: I'm going to be talking about a damned interesting application that ... Read More

Transparency and Public Shaming: Pakistan Tackles Tax Evasion

In Pakistan, where only one in 200 citizens files their income tax return, authorities published a directory of taxpayers' details for the first time. Officials explained the decision as an attempt to shame defaulters into paying up.

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wednesday >

Facebook Seeks Approval as Financial Service in Ireland. Is the Developing World Next?

On April 13 the Financial Times reported that Facebook is only weeks away from being approved as a financial service in Ireland. Is this foray into e-money motivated by Facebook's desire to conquer the developing world before other corporate Internet giants do? Maybe.

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The Rise and Fall of Iran's “Blogestan”

The robust community of Iranian bloggers—sometimes nicknamed “Blogestan”—has shrunk since its heyday between 2002 – 2010. “Whither Blogestan,” a recent report from the University of Pennsylvania's Iran Media Program sought to find out how and why. The researchers performed a web crawling analysis of Blogestan, survey 165 Persian blog users, and conducted 20 interviews with influential bloggers in the Persian community. They found multiple causes of the decline in blogging, including increased social media use and interference from authorities.

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tuesday >

Weekly Readings: What the Govt Wants to Know

A roundup of interesting reads and stories from around the web. GO

Russia to Treat Bloggers Like Mass Media Because "the F*cking Journalists Won't Stop Writing"

The worldwide debate over who is and who isn't a journalist has raged since digital media made it much easier for citizen journalists and other “amateurs” to compete with the big guys. In the United States, journalists are entitled to certain protections under the law, such as the right to confidential sources. As such, many argue that blogging should qualify as journalism because independent writers deserve the same legal protections as corporate employees. In Russia, however, earning a place equal to mass media means additional regulations and obligations, which some say will lead to the repression of free speech.

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Politics for People: Demanding Transparent and Ethical Lobbying in the EU

Today the Alliance for Lobbying Transparency and Ethics Regulation (ALTER-EU) launched a campaign called Politics for People that asks candidates for the European Parliament to pledge to stand up to secretive industry lobbyists and to advocate for transparency. The Politics for People website connects voters with information about their MEP candidates and encourages them to reach out on Facebook, Twitter or by email to ask them to sign the pledge.

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monday >

Security Agencies Given Full Access to Telecom Data Even Though "All Lebanese Can Not Be Suspects"

In late March, Lebanese government ministers granted security agencies unrestricted access to telecommunications data in spite of some ministers objections that it violates privacy rights. Global Voices reports that the policy violates Lebanon's existing surveillance and privacy law, Law 140, but has gotten little coverage from the country's mainstream media.

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