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Democracy.com Shines Searchlight on Candidates and Elected Officials

BY Miranda Neubauer | Thursday, June 5 2014

Democracy.com announced Thursday that it has unveiled what it calls the most comprehensive searchable database of American elected officials, candidates, appointees and political organizations at all levels of government. As techPresident previously reported, the non-partisan Democracy.com platform launched last fall with the aim of establishing a social network for politics with a focus on helping local candidates have access to a professional web presence and fundraising tools. With the rollout of the expanded search function, Democracy.com hopes to take another step towards making the political process more accessible in spite of a fractured American political landscape, explained Talmage Cooley, founder and CEO of Democracy.com. Read More

WeGov

Hashtag Activism Has Profound Psychological Effects On Movement Creators & Participants

BY Jessica McKenzie | Thursday, June 5 2014

Screenshot of a #NotYourTigerLily tweet

It has become quite trendy these days to downplay or mock hashtag activism, or what many dismiss as “slacktivism.” The takeaway from the Thursday morning session on “The Internet's Double-Edged Sword” at Personal Democracy Forum, however, was that even seemingly small actions play an important role in movement building, especially on the psychological level.

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Edward #Snowden at #PDF14

BY Rebecca Chao | Thursday, June 5 2014

A storify of Edward #Snowden's talk at #PDF14 Read More

Reset the Net: Shutting Off the Lights to Government Surveillance

BY Rebecca Chao | Thursday, June 5 2014

Screenshot

Richard Nixon had the tape recorder. The next Nixon will have the NSA's entire Utah data center said Holmes Wilson and Tiffiniy Cheng during this morning's session explaining "Reset the Net," an anti-surveillance ... Read More

First POST: Trust Deficit

BY Rebecca Chao | Thursday, June 5 2014

What Silicon Valley, the Queen has to say one year after Snowden about surveillance and hacking; are new e-security screenings for the TSA like NSA meets "stop and frisk"?; time to "reset the net"; and much much more. Read More

First POST: Turning On

BY Micah L. Sifry | Wednesday, June 4 2014

How Google is making encryption more mainstream; new data on online harassment; how bloggers are changing Vietnamese society; and much, much more. Read More

WeGov

Remembering to Forget: A Snapshot of Censorship in China on the 25th Anniversary of the Tiananmen Massacre

BY Jessica McKenzie | Wednesday, June 4 2014

A quarter of a century has passed since the Tiananmen Square massacre on June 4, 1989, but the Chinese government is working as hard as ever to suppress memories and mentions of the event. This year: verbally blasting Google and other American technology companies through state media outlets, LinkedIn's capitulation to censorship demands, even outside mainland China, and more than 64 Tiananmen-related words blocked from online searches today, including the word “today.”

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Edward Snowden, a Year Later

BY Fabio Chiusi | Wednesday, June 4 2014

A protest against the European parliament's refusal to offer Snowden protection (greensefa/flickr)

One year has passed since Edward Snowden revealed himself to the world as the whistleblower who leaked hundreds of National Security Agency documents and exposed the true scope and workings of its mass surveillance operations. What have we learned thanks to Snowden's revelations? What has the government done and has anything changed for the better? Read More

For Measuring Impact of Journalism and Advocacy, Data is Not Just Data

BY Miranda Neubauer | Tuesday, June 3 2014

Going beyond simply counting clicks to using data to inform journalistic or policy goals was a recurring theme among the panelists participating in the first research conference sponsored by the Journalism School's Tow Center for Digital Journalism, as Miranda Neubauer reports. Read More

WeGov

The Trolls on Putin's Payroll

BY Jessica McKenzie | Tuesday, June 3 2014

Self-explanatory (Wikipedia)

“If it looks like Kremlin shit, smells like Kremlin shit, and tastes like Kremlin shit too — then it’s Kremlin shit,” says Moscow-based writer and columnist Leonid Bershidsky, about Internet trolls-for-hire who have been paid to post laudatory comments about Putin and Russia on English-language news articles. Buzzfeed's Max Seddon reports on the leaks that reveal Russia's offensive strategy to win friends and influence people abroad.

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News Briefs

RSS Feed friday >

First POST: Scotched

Why conservatives should back net neutrality; how big data may damage civil rights; the ways Silicon Valley start-ups are exploiting freelance workers; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: Resets

Apple's new iOS8 promises greater user privacy; Occupy Wall Street three years later; how tech may tilt the Scotland independence vote; and much, much more. GO

wednesday >

First POST: Connecting the Dots

Take Back the Tech grades Facebook, Twitter, et al, on transparency; MayDay PAC founder Lawrence Lessig talks about getting matched funds; and much, much more. GO

tuesday >

First POST: Splits

USA Freedom Act divides Internet activists; Julian Assange's Reddit "Ask Me Anything"; New York's pro-net-neutrality protest; and much, much more GO

monday >

After Election Loss, Teachout and Wu Keep Up Net Neutrality and Anti-Comcast Merger Campaign

The Teachout/Wu campaign may have lost, but their pro net-neutrality campaign continued Monday as both former candidates participated in a rallly in New York City marking the final day to comment on the Federal Communications Commission's Internet proposals and kept up their pressure on Governor Andrew Cuomo. GO

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