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First POST: Sentimental

BY Micah L. Sifry | Monday, November 10 2014

Why 2016 is going to be "the Facebook election"; why Berlin has become the global hub for anti-surveillance culture; how some American cities are fighting to expand their public broadband services; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Boosts

BY Micah L. Sifry | Friday, November 7 2014

Announcing PDM's new project, Civic Hall; how the GOP's 2014 voter contact program worked; civic tech and volunteerism; and much, much more. Read More

Announcing Civic Hall

BY Andrew Rasiej and Micah L. Sifry | Friday, November 7 2014

Here at Personal Democracy Media, we have some big news. We're launching a major new project called Civic Hall. It's a vibrant, collaborative community center and event space in the Flatiron District of Manhattan where civic tech innovators from diverse backgrounds can work, network, learn and organize together to tackle and solve civic problems at scale. With the generous support of our founding sponsors Microsoft, the Omidyar Network and Google, and founding partners like New America, The New York Tech Meetup and others, we are excited to tell you that we're on our way! Read More

First POST: Downplaying

BY Micah L. Sifry | Thursday, November 6 2014

Debating what happened to the Democrats' vaunted tech-powered turnout machine in 2014; how Healthcare.gov hurt Democratic incumbents; understanding the participatory engine that is Wikipedia; and much, much more. Read More

WeGov

After Sunflower Movement, Taiwan's g0v Uses Open Source to Open the Government

BY Sonia Roubini and Jason R. Tashea | Wednesday, November 5 2014

g0v took the lead in organizing Taiwan's Sunflower movement (speedbug/flickr)

This past March, the online community g0v helped organize hundreds of protestors to storm Taiwan’s parliament, the Legislative Yuan, in opposition to a pending trade deal with China. Now g0v wants to make the government more transparent and accessible. By doing so, it hopes to help citizens understand both how government works and how to make it better. Read More

First POST: Voters Speak

BY Micah L. Sifry | Wednesday, November 5 2014

Inside the GOP's big listening machine; how the midterm vote played out on Facebook and Twitter; how tech isn't (and is) addressing inequality; and much, much more. Read More

How Progressive Groups Used Facebook to Check 2014 Voting Behavior

BY Miranda Neubauer | Tuesday, November 4 2014

(via Jeff Lennan)

Facebook ran its "voter megaphone" initiative in the United States Tuesday, letting users indicate whether they are voting and see similar messages from their friends, as our Micah Sifry has been covering in detail. But what about the possibility of actually being able to verify that your Facebook friends have voted? That is the functionality made possible through a tool in use over the past week ins Oregon, Washington and Colorado. Built by developer Josh Cohen, it lets users check whether their Facebook friends in those states participated in early voting based on ballot data and send them a Facebook message. Read More

First POST: Big Bad Data

BY Micah L. Sifry | Tuesday, November 4 2014

Why big data is bad for political reporting and campaigns; tracking Facebook's voter megaphone; a progress report on the Loomio group decision-making platform; and much, much more. Read More

Help Us #FactcheckFacebook's Election Efforts Today

BY Micah L. Sifry | Tuesday, November 4 2014

Master OSM 2011/flickr

Today is Election Day in the United States, and along with the many efforts by campaigns and advocacy groups to get out their voters, Facebook is taking a big step to push people to the polls. As I reported last week for Mother Jones, for the first time in six years, Facebook says it is rolling out its "voter megaphone"--a banner across the top of each user's page like the one shown above--to all of its users above the age of 18 in the United States. That's somewhere upwards of 150 million people, if all goes according to plan. Will it work? And will the company do it in a neutral manner? We're asking readers to help answer those questions. Read More

Recreation.gov a Test Case for Government Tech

BY Miranda Neubauer | Monday, November 3 2014

A request for proposals under consideration for a new revamping of recreation.gov, the government's portal for outdoor trip planning, could be an opportunity to apply the innovative vision of 18F, the new digital services team within the General Services Administration, established in the spring, and of the new U.S. Digital Service within the Office of Management and Budget, civic technologists say. Read More

News Briefs

RSS Feed today >

Mark Pesce on "Hypercivility" at @CivicHall

A week ago, digital ethnologist Mark Pesce gave a talk here at Civic Hall on the topic of "Hypercivility." As you will see from watching the video, it's an extension of years of research and thinking he has done on the effects of hyperconnectivity on our world. Be forewarned, this is not an "easy" talk to watch or digest. While Pesce definitely has our social-media-powered "Age of Outrage" on his mind, he grounds his talk in a much more serious place: post-genocide Rwanda, which he recently visited. GO

First POST: Impossibles

The FCC vote; a proxy Democratic primary battle in Chicago; Gov Andrew Cuomo begins deleting all state employee emails more than 90 days old; men talking about women in tech; and much, much more. GO

wednesday >

First POST: Off the Books

Chicago's "black site"; The New York Times reports "little guys" like Tumblr and Reddit have won the fight for net neutrality but fails to mention Free Press or Demand Progress; Hillary Clinton fan products on Etsy to inspire campaign slogans?; and much, much more. GO

tuesday >

First POST: Challenges

How Silicon Valley donors are thinking about Hillary Clinton 2016; Yahoo's security chief locks horns with the head of the NSA; Instagram location data catches a Congressman with his hand in the till; and much, much more. GO

monday >

First POST: Bows

CitizenFour wins best doc; Ken Silverstein resigned from First Look Media and took to Facebook to vent; why we need more Congressional staffers; who profits from the net neutrality debate; banning PowerPoint presentations; and much, much more. GO

friday >

First POST: Sim Pickings

Using stolen encryption keys, the NSA and GCHQ can intercept and decrypt communications between billions of phones without notifying the service provider, foreign governments or users; get to know Sarah Harrison, the WikiLeaks editor who helped Snowden gain asylum in Russia; a profile of the Fight for the Future leaders; how the new wave of black community organizing is not hashtag activism; and much, much more. GO

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