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A New Tool To Count Chicago's Crimes

BY Miranda Neubauer | Friday, March 22 2013

The apps team of the Chicago Tribune has announced a first release of a Chicago Crime API, offering more than 12 years of Chicago crime data, in an "easy, fast, useful and rich way," news applications developer David Eads writes in a blog post. The City of Chicago already provides access to this data through Socrata. But that interface can be "fussy and hard to integrate," Eads writes. Read More

"Internet in a Suitcase:" Not Really in a Suitcase, But Really On Its Way

BY Miranda Neubauer | Thursday, March 21 2013

The so-called "Internet in a suitcase" project reached another milestone Wednesday as the New America Foundation's Open Technology Institute announced the public developer release of the free open source wireless networking platform Commotion Beta. Read More

New York City Launches a Tool to Drill Down On Government Spending

BY Miranda Neubauer | Wednesday, March 20 2013

A little over a week after the first milestone for New York City's Open Data Law, Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Comptroller John Liu announced Tuesday that New York City would become the first municipality in the country to establish a comprehensive subcontracting database that would publicly report payments made by primary contractors to subcontractors. Read More

Report Ranks Federal Agencies On How Much They Allow Scientists to Share Online

BY Miranda Neubauer | Friday, March 15 2013

NASA may get a lot of attention for its use of social media to engage with the public, but according to one group, the National Institutes of Health takes the cake on Twitter. The Union of Concerned Scientists has issued grades for the social media policies of federal agencies, with a focus on how the policies protect the ability of government scientists to communicate freely. Read More

Almost 70 Localities Join New York State Open Data Platform

BY Miranda Neubauer | Thursday, March 14 2013

Almost 70 localities have now signed up to share their data on New York state's open data platform three days after its launch, according to a state press release. Read More

Habemus ... Gene Sperling On Reddit

BY Miranda Neubauer | Wednesday, March 13 2013

The news hoopla surrounding the new pope did not prevent Gene Sperling, assistant to the president for economic policy, from answering some of the questions posed to him on the social news site Reddit Wednesday afternoon. Read More

The White House Wants Civic Hackers for New Round of Presidential Innovation Fellowship

BY Miranda Neubauer | Tuesday, March 12 2013

There are five days left to apply for the second round of the Presidential Innovation Fellows program, which will continue work on projects from last year's first round and work to develop new projects. The program is geared towards innovators and entrepreneurs from the private sector, non-profits and academia who are interested in working on government projects that take an innovative approach to promoting job creation, saving lives and saving taxpayer money. Read More

Under Open Data Law, New York City Begins Herding Its Data

BY Miranda Neubauer | Monday, March 11 2013

New York City had until last Thursday to meet the first deadline set in its now year-old open data law by making data already published on nyc.gov available in machine-readable format, rather than in PDF format. According to a city press release, there are now over 1,000 data sets available on New York City's Open Data platform. The platform launched in October of 2011 with 750 data sets, 250 of which were new at the time. Since the law was signed in March of last year, New York City's Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications (DoITT) has been working with agencies to add 350 new data sets to the platform and worked to add regularly updated feeds to existing data sets. Read More

Courting Suburban Civic Hackers in Illinois

BY Miranda Neubauer | Monday, March 11 2013

Rockford Meet-Up (Facebook/Daniel X. O'Neil)

Writing software to make cities and towns easier to live in seems like it's been a primarily urban hobby until now, with big cities like New York, Chicago, Boston and Philadelphia hogging all the headlines. Hoping to change that, Illinois state officials and nonprofits launched the Illinois Open Technology Challenge, promising $75,000 in prize money distributed to software developers that use state or city data in applications designed for users outside of Chicago rather than inside of it. Contest organizers have moved the challenge's deadline back two weeks, to March 29. Read More

News Briefs

RSS Feed today >

First POST: All Against All

Why Uber isn't "the future" of cities; why journalists lost control of journalism; how Sean Parker is spending his political money; and much, much more. GO

friday >

First POST: Power Frames

The differences between "old power" and "new power"; Uber as a new/old power hybrid; debating Clay Shirky's feminist cred; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: Creeping

Senator Al Franken's tough questions for Uber's CEO; how the NSA could make its phone metadata program permanent; global privacy groups launch a personal spyware catcher called Detekt; and much, much more. GO

Recreation.gov and other Govt Projects Move Toward Embracing New Digital Approach

A draft request for proposals for the revamping of Recreation.gov will include a requirement that reservation availability data be publicly accessible and that all proposals detail how they will enable third-party sales, as two members of the United States Digital Services have joined the government team overseeing the RFP, meeting some key demands of civic technologists and consumer oriented technology companies. GO

wednesday >

First POST: Ubermenschens

Surge-pricing in effect for Uber privacy violations; why "privacy" policies should be called "data usage" policies; pols silent on Uber mess; and much, much more. GO

tuesday >

First POST: Uber Falles

Uber exposed for plan to dig up dirt on journalist critics; sneaking a SOPA provision into the USA Freedom Act; high-speed free WiFi coming to NYC; and much, much more. GO

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