Personal Democracy Plus Our premium content network. LEARN MORE You are not logged in. LOG IN NOW >

Wikileaks Fan Page Pulled Down for Being "Inauthentic," Says Facebook

BY Nancy Scola | Wednesday, April 21 2010

Valleywag reported earlier today on a tweeted complaint from the secret-clearinghouse Wikileaks that a Facebook fan page was deleted with little explanation.

Facebook spokesperson Andrew Noyes tells me this afternoon that the specific reason why the Wikileaks fan page was pulled down was because it was not an official page maintained by the organization. That made the Wikileaks fan page unacceptably "inauthentic," said Noyes:

The disabled Wikileaks page was flagged as an inauthentic Facebook page and its fans will be migrated to the authentic page soon. The administrator of the inauthentic page violated our Statement of Rights and Responsibilities [link], particularly Section 12.2, which states: “You may only administer a Facebook page if you are an authorized representative of the subject of the page.”

According to Valleywag's reporting, what was at issue was in fact a "fan club" page, but one that Wikileaks itself seemed to be supportive of. At least, in a tweet earlier this month, @wikileaks posted "Join our Facebook Fanclub at http://bit.ly/wl-fanclub ! (owner of fan club please contact wl-supporters@sunshinepress.org.)" The fact that ownernship over the Facebook group is at issue gets particularly interesting in the Wikileaks case, where the global organization's lines leadership haven't always been clear. Wikileaks' Twitter presence, at least, expressed displeasure at the group's deletion, tweeting "Wikileaks facebook page deleted together with 30,000 fans... boiler place response includes '..promote illegal acts...'"

Getting information from Facebook today is made more difficult by the fact that today happens to be the day of the company's F8 developer conference in San Francisco. And what's happening at that conference is also why the Wikileaks pulldown gives some extra pause. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg's keynote focused on threading the Facebook platform past the site's own borders and throughout the rest of the web. CNET's Caroline McCarthy described it as a vision of next web "where Facebook is the center of it all." And being part of that future means, it seems, playing by Facebook's rules.

News Briefs

RSS Feed tuesday >

First POST: Stalking

How the DEA tracks millions of America motorists; will the Senate enter the 21st century?; Obama veteran Jeremy Bird's role in the upcoming Israeli election; and much, much more. GO

monday >

First POST: Video Stars

How the White House hit a home run on YouTube post-State of the Union; why the Barrett Brown sentencing casts a chill on online security research; how media producers use Crowdtangle to optimize their Facebook audiences; and much, much more. GO

friday >

First POST: Moneyballed

The Gates Foundation's new "global citizens" email database, and why it's a terrible idea; why young people like the NSA more than older people; using open data about NYC taxi drivers to ID Muslims; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: Monkeying

Net neutrality proponents call foul on the GOP's plans; StandUnited.com seeks to be the right's Change.org; tons of civic tech news from mySociety, Chicago and Civic Hall in NYC; and much, much more. GO

wednesday >

First POST: Punch List

Obama's State of the Union and the Internet; how HealthCare.gov shares personal data with third-parties; Facebook says it will give users tools to tag false or hoax content in their News Feeds; and much, much more. GO

More