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What Matters Now?

BY Micah L. Sifry | Monday, December 14 2009

"What Matters Now" is a question we should ask ourselves all the time, but it also happens to be the title of a new, free e-book curated by our friend (and occasional PdF speaker) Seth Godin. He asked 70 people, including yours truly, to each contribute a page offering their answer, focused on one word that matters, plus a short (under 200 words) explanation. The result is a spicy bon-bon of a book, alternately compelling, contradictory, and provocative. You can download your copy here.

The words contributed by each contributor are listed below. You need to download the eBook to read the accompanying essays. I'm humbled to be in such good company.

  1. Generosity by Seth Godin
  2. Fear by Anne Jackson
  3. Facts by Jessica Hagy
  4. Diginity by Jacqueline Novogratz
  5. Meaning by Hugh McLeod
  6. Ease by Elizabeth Gilbert (author of Eat, Pray and Love)
  7. Connected by Howard Mann
  8. Re-Capitalism by Chris Meyer
  9. Vision by Michael Hyatt
  10. Enrichment by Rajesh Setty
  11. 1% by Jackie Huba and Ben McConnell
  12. Speaking by Mark Hurst
  13. ATOMS by Chris Anderson
  14. Excellence by Tom Peters
  15. Most by William C. Taylor
  16. Strengths by Marti Barletta
  17. Ripple by John Wood
  18. Unsustainability by Alan Webber
  19. Autonomy by Dan Pink
  20. Poker by Tony Hsieh
  21. Momentum by Dave Ramsey
  22. Consequence by Saul Griffith
  23. Power by Jeffrey Pfeffer
  24. Harmony by Jack Covert
  25. Tough-Mindedness by Steven Pressfield
  26. Evangelism by Guy Kawasaki
  27. Compassion by Mitch Joel
  28. Knowledge by Alisa Miller
  29. Parsing by Clay Johnson
  30. Forever by Piers Fawkes
  31. Empathy by Karen Armstrong
  32. Neoteny by Joi Ito
  33. Celebrate by Megan Casey
  34. DIY by Jay Parkinson
  35. Adventure by Robyn Waters
  36. Dumb by Dave Balter
  37. Nobody by Micah L. Sifry
  38. Analog by George Dyson
  39. Independent Diplomacy by Carne Ross
  40. THNX by Gary Vaynerchuk
  41. Attention by David Meerman Scott
  42. Context by Jeff Jonas
  43. Change by Chip and Dan Heath
  44. Passion by Derek Sivers
  45. Magnetize by Fred Krupp
  46. Confidence by Tim Sanders
  47. Slow Capital by Fred Wilson
  48. Open-Source DNA by Kevin Kelly
  49. Technology by Phoebe Espiritu
  50. Expertise by Aaron Wall
  51. Fascination by Sally Hogshead
  52. Difference by David Weinberger
  53. World Healers by Martha Beck
  54. Sacrifice by John Moore
  55. Focus by Todd Sattersten
  56. Leap by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  57. Women by Paco Underhill
  58. Timeless by Mark Rovner
  59. .eDO by Dale Dougherty
  60. Productivity by Gina Trapani
  61. Iterative Capital by Michael Scharge
  62. Willpower by Ramit Sethi
  63. Mesh by Lisa Gansky
  64. Enough by Merlin Mann
  65. (Dis)Trust by Dan Ariely
  66. Social Skills by Penelope Trunk
  67. I’m Sorry by Jason Fried
  68. Sleep by Arianna Huffington
  69. Knowing by Dan Roam
  70. Government 2.0 by Tim O’Reilly
  71. You Can’t by Aimee Johnson
  72. Gumption by J.C. Hutchins

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