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On Twitter, #OWS is Alive and Kicking in Many Cities

BY Micah L. Sifry | Tuesday, October 25 2011

While the focus of the Occupy movement is obviously Wall Street, and the bulk of the media attention is on the people encamped and encircling Zuccotti Park in downtown Manhattan, the other big story of the OWS movement is how rapidly it has spread to dozens of other cities, large and small. One illustration of the vibrancy of these other encampments is the ongoing Twitter conversations using their hashtags.

Below are two charts provided to techPresident by Gilad Lotan, VP of R&D at SocialFlow. (He and his team wrote a very interesting article last week examining how hard it is for a hashtag like #OWS to trend on Twitter, and a follow-up post on how the #OWS hashtag spread online.)

This first chart shows that there is a robust daily pulse of conversation around the occupations in Los Angeles, Washington D.C., Philadelphia, San Diego and Chicago. These are all places that have fairly large Facebook groups devoted to them--LA, Chicago and Philly each have more than 20,000 "likes."

The second offers a close-up of the data for the last three days related to those cities. As you can see, the chatter is constant. Even without high-profile media attention, people interested in what is going on with these cities' protests are very engaged, on a minute-by-minute basis.

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New Media Sites in Iran Blur Lines Between Citizen Journo, Professional Journo, & Activist

In 2010, Newsweek declared Iran the “birthplace of citizen journalism.” Iranian bloggers were hailed by Westerners as “brave” for their coverage of the aftermath of the disputed 2009 election. A 40-second video of the death of Neda Agha-Soltan during an anti-government protest won a prestigious George Polk Award, the first anonymously-produced work to be so honored. And then came the 2013 study “Whither Blogestan,” which sought to explain Iran's shrinking blogosphere. Of nearly 25,000 highly active and connected blogs in 2008 and 2009, only 20 percent were still online in September 2013.

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