Personal Democracy Plus Our premium content network. LEARN MORE You are not logged in. LOG IN NOW >

Tom Udall's a Ninja. Watch Out!

BY Nancy Scola | Friday, March 26 2010

You just have to applaud when politicians who weren't once professional comedians can put together a web video on a serious public policy topic that's actually funny. Like, real live human funny. Tom Udall and Ben Ray Lujan, Senator and Representative respectively from the great state of New Mexico managed to do so in a bid to win Google's attention in the company's 1Gps fiber-to-the-home broadband experiment.

Udall and Lujan, both Democrats, riff off of the Al Franken's "Duluth Answer Man" video pitch to Google that you might remember we mentioned recently. Franken's bit on behalf of Twin Ports was very funny, too. But come on. Riiiinngerrrr.

In the Udall/Lujan set up, the pair are web chatting about the Franken video, with the representative out in the city Farmington in northwestern New Mexico. The shoddy Internet connection out there, though, breaks up their conversations. That leaves Udall looking like he's saying such uncharacteristic things as "I'm a ninja. Watch out." It actually makes for some clever moments. Give it a watch. We're not saying that it's the funniest two minutes of video in the world. But it's funnier than almost any two minutes of Saturday Night Live are.

There is a serious side to all this, though. The Navajo Nation makes its home in that bit of northwest New Mexico, and as the National Broadband Plan recently detailed, access to broadband on tribal lands in the United States is, at best, only about 10%.

News Briefs

RSS Feed wednesday >

First POST: Responding

The aftermath of Ferguson continues to reverberate; how one Senate campaign took advantage of Facebook's micro-targeting tools; the new Congress' tech agenda; and much, much more GO

tuesday >

First POST: Sad Reality

How social media changed the course of the Ferguson story; Ready for Hillary's 3-million-member email list; why Mark Cuban opposes net neutrality rules; and much, much more. GO

monday >

First POST: All Against All

Why Uber isn't "the future" of cities; why journalists lost control of journalism; how Sean Parker is spending his political money; and much, much more. GO

friday >

First POST: Power Frames

The differences between "old power" and "new power"; Uber as a new/old power hybrid; debating Clay Shirky's feminist cred; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: Creeping

Senator Al Franken's tough questions for Uber's CEO; how the NSA could make its phone metadata program permanent; global privacy groups launch a personal spyware catcher called Detekt; and much, much more. GO

Recreation.gov and other Govt Projects Move Toward Embracing New Digital Approach

A draft request for proposals for the revamping of Recreation.gov will include a requirement that reservation availability data be publicly accessible and that all proposals detail how they will enable third-party sales, as two members of the United States Digital Services have joined the government team overseeing the RFP, meeting some key demands of civic technologists and consumer oriented technology companies. GO

More