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Tetwtir Ptoormes Goalbl Latceriy

BY Nancy Scola | Thursday, September 9 2010

Twitter, as in the company, used its Hope 140 banner yesterday to support what it's calling Literacy Day 2010. They've asked folks to tweet out the pre-packaged note to the right to their followers "so they know what it's like to be illiterate."

Creative. A good cause. Except...well, the scrambled tweet's pretty readable as is. You might have gotten the email. While it might be urban legend that scientific research has proven that scrambled words are comprehensible as long as the first and last letters remain in place, it also happens to be actually true. "Ptoorme" is the one word that I, for one, stumbled over. It also happens to be one of the few words in the tweet that doesn't retain the same book-end characters. There's a fancy portmanteau for it -- typoglycemia. You accomplish it, it seems, through scrmabling.

Anyway, that's neither here nor there. Click on the link provided in the tweet, and Twitter not only provides an unscrambled version, but offers people a chance to help promote literacy by either buying wine from its Fledgling winery that goes, in part, to support education in India, or by making a donation used to publish children's books in Asia and Africa.

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New Media Sites in Iran Blur Lines Between Citizen Journo, Professional Journo, & Activist

In 2010, Newsweek declared Iran the “birthplace of citizen journalism.” Iranian bloggers were hailed by Westerners as “brave” for their coverage of the aftermath of the disputed 2009 election. A 40-second video of the death of Neda Agha-Soltan during an anti-government protest won a prestigious George Polk Award, the first anonymously-produced work to be so honored. And then came the 2013 study “Whither Blogestan,” which sought to explain Iran's shrinking blogosphere. Of nearly 25,000 highly active and connected blogs in 2008 and 2009, only 20 percent were still online in September 2013.

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