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StreamGraphing Obama, The NY Times and Your Government at Work

BY Micah L. Sifry | Monday, November 30 2009

Jeff Clark (@jeffclark)at Neoformix is doing amazing work with data visualization. Check out his Twitter "StreamGraph" tool, for example. It shows the usage over time for the words most highly associated with your search term. Here's a look at the latest 1000 tweets mentioning "Obama":

I've highlighted the expanding thread mentioning Michael Moore's handle (@mmflint) since the film-maker has just posted an "open letter" to the president asking him to not escalate the war in Afghanistan, and people are clearly retweeting it like crazy.

Clark's tool also works with Twitter lists. Here's the stream for @nytimes/staff, a list of 95 people created by the newspaper. Hmm, seems like everyone just wants to talk about Tiger Woods and football! (Keep in mind, this stream is mostly from the Thanksgiving holiday weekend.)

Finally, here's the White House's "@whitehouse/usg" list of 41 different agency twitter feeds. An interesting way to see what your government has been up to, 1000 tweets at a time, no?

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