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The SEO White House

BY Nancy Scola | Thursday, March 25 2010

Credit: Google.com

This was noted down-blog, but it's a savvy enough use of technology by the White House that it's worth pointing out again.

On Tuesday afternoon, just after President Obama signed the health care bill into law, Google searches rocketed upwards for the phrase "What's in the Health Care Bill?," as we noted at the time. There was, the data showed, a hunger in the United States for information on what the legislation would actually mean for the country.

At the time, the top-rated Google search results for that phrase were news reports, and third-party analysis of the bill -- not all of it admiring of the legislation. In fact, much of it was quite negative towards the health care reform legislation.

And so, the White House swooped into action. At about 4:30 in the afternoon, a post went up on the White House blog titled the exact same phrase as that top Google search term -- "What's in the Health Care Bill?"

A simple move, perhaps, but also rather brilliant. The White House's blog post drove WhiteHouse.gov to the top of Google search results. Same with Yahoo.

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