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Romney's on The Tube, Obama Dominates Online, Rudy Loves Radio

BY Colin Delany | Wednesday, July 11 2007

Cross-posted on e.politics

Neilsen has published some fascinating details on how the presidential candidates are spending their media money and what kind of results they're getting for it. MarketingCharts.com has the numbers; here are some highlights:

  • Romney and Hunter were the first on television, but Hunter ran very few spots while Romney had slapped over 4500 ads on the air as of June 11th — more than the other candidates combined. Richardson had led Dems on tv, but since early June, Dodd, Edwards and Obama have also jumped on local television in battleground states. Not surprisingly, advertising in Iowa and New Hampshire dominates the total.
  • Romney's also been on local radio, but not as much as Guiliani, who'd run more than twice as many radio ads as of June 1. Interesting note: Rudy's scattered his around the country rather than concentrating on early primary states.
  • Dems dominate online buzz, and despite running no online advertising, Obama received more blog discussion and more site visits and visitors than any other candidate. Hillary Clinton's site ranked second in traffic.
  • Romney is the only candidate to purchase a significant number of cable tv ads as of June 1. Dodd also bought some cable time, but only four spots.
  • As has been previously reported, McCain has led in the use of search and display advertising online (26 million impressions in April alone), which may have helped him get more site traffic than any other Republican. Still, the three leading Dems' sites all got more visitors than his, and Romney was "a distant sixth" in the overall rankings.

Get more details here and from Neilsen's site; thanks to MarketingVox for the tip.

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