Personal Democracy Plus Our premium content network. LEARN MORE You are not logged in. LOG IN NOW >

Romney's on The Tube, Obama Dominates Online, Rudy Loves Radio

BY Colin Delany | Wednesday, July 11 2007

Cross-posted on e.politics

Neilsen has published some fascinating details on how the presidential candidates are spending their media money and what kind of results they're getting for it. MarketingCharts.com has the numbers; here are some highlights:

  • Romney and Hunter were the first on television, but Hunter ran very few spots while Romney had slapped over 4500 ads on the air as of June 11th — more than the other candidates combined. Richardson had led Dems on tv, but since early June, Dodd, Edwards and Obama have also jumped on local television in battleground states. Not surprisingly, advertising in Iowa and New Hampshire dominates the total.
  • Romney's also been on local radio, but not as much as Guiliani, who'd run more than twice as many radio ads as of June 1. Interesting note: Rudy's scattered his around the country rather than concentrating on early primary states.
  • Dems dominate online buzz, and despite running no online advertising, Obama received more blog discussion and more site visits and visitors than any other candidate. Hillary Clinton's site ranked second in traffic.
  • Romney is the only candidate to purchase a significant number of cable tv ads as of June 1. Dodd also bought some cable time, but only four spots.
  • As has been previously reported, McCain has led in the use of search and display advertising online (26 million impressions in April alone), which may have helped him get more site traffic than any other Republican. Still, the three leading Dems' sites all got more visitors than his, and Romney was "a distant sixth" in the overall rankings.

Get more details here and from Neilsen's site; thanks to MarketingVox for the tip.

cpd

News Briefs

RSS Feed tuesday >

With Vision of Internet Magna Carta, Web We Want Campaign Aims To Go Beyond Protest Mode

On Saturday, Tim Berners-Lee reiterated his call for an Internet Magna Carta to ensure the independence and openness of the World Wide Web and protection of user privacy. His remarks were part of the opening of the Web We Want Festival at the Southbank Centre in London, which the Web We Want campaign envisioned as only the start of a year long international process underlying his call to formulate concrete visions for the open web of the future, going beyond protests and the usual advocacy groups. GO

First POST: Lifestyles

Google's CEO on "work-life balance"; how CloudFlare just doubled the size of the encrypted web; Dems like Twitter; Reps like Pinterest; and much, much more. GO

monday >

First POST: Showdown

How demonstrators in Hong Kong are using mobile tech to route around government control; will the news penetrate mainland China?; dueling spin from Dems and Reps on which party's tech efforts will matter more in November; and much, much more. GO

friday >

Pirate MEP Crowdsources Internet Policy Questions For Designated EU Commissioners

While the Pirate Party within Germany was facing internal disputes over the last week, the German Pirate Party member in the European Parliament, Julia Reda, is seeking to make the European Commission appointment process more transparent by crowdsourcing questions for the designated Commissioner for Digital Economy & Society and the designated Vice President for the Digital Single Market. GO

First POST: Dogfood

What ethical social networking might look like; can the iPhone promise more privacy?; how Obama did on transparency; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: Sucks

How the FCC can't communicate; tech is getting more political; Facebook might see a lawsuit for its mood manipulation experiment; and much, much more. GO

wednesday >

First POST: Wartime

A bizarre online marketing effort targets actress Emma Watson; why the news media needs to defend the privacy of its online readers; Chicago's playbook for civic user testing; and much, much more. GO

More