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Rick Perry "Strong" Parodies Overrun YouTube

BY Sarah Lai Stirland | Friday, December 9 2011

With more than three million views, Texas Governor and Republican presidential candidate Rick Perry's most recent television ad rocketed off the charts when it went online. It became the hottest political video on YouTube on Wednesday when it also made its debut on Iowans' television sets.

In case you hadn't heard, Perry says there's something "wrong in the country," when "gays can serve openly in the military, but our kids can't openly celebrate Christmas or pray in school."

Thousands of those who watched the video clicked on the "dislike" button (474,305 dislikes and 11,981 likes.)

But the campaign video has also spawned dozens and dozens of parodies, the most popular of which is political comedy veteran's Andy Cobb's on The Second City Network, with more than half a million views, and 34,059 likes and 1,095 likes:

The video is currently the third-most viewed and shared video of the day, according to YouTube's Trends dashboard.

But there are plenty of others, such as Detroit's Rabbi Jason's parody video saying that he's "not ashamed to say that I'm a Jew -- Heck, I'm even a Rabbi ..."

(Rabbi Jason is also a social media expert.)

Of course James Kotecki was one of the first to come out with a parody:

and then there's this offering from National Lampoon, "Behind the scenes of Rick Perry's 'Strong' TV ad taping," in which the candidate is forced to do multiple re-takes because of his not-safe-for-work, not-good-to-listen-to-if-you're-easily-offended choice of language:

But it's probably Perry's campaign team laughing all the way to the bank right now. The campaign has embedded the video on its landing page, suggesting that it's getting some support for Perry's controversial statement.

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