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Report: SCOTUS Denies C-SPAN's Last Request for Same-Day Audio This Term

BY Nancy Scola | Wednesday, April 14 2010

Credit: Ken McCown

C-SPAN, you might recall, has been pushing the U.S. Supreme Court to open up its proceedings through TV broadcasts and release of same-day audio recordings. Sometimes it has some luck, and other times it doesn't. The 2009-201o term seems to have been an unlucky stretch. A C-SPAN contact writes to say that its seventh and final request this term for same-day audio was denied earlier today. The proceedings at issue are Monday's oral arguments in Christian Legal Society Chapter v. Martinez, which has to do with the recognition of a religious group at a public law school when that group excludes gays and lesbians. That leaves C-SPAN's requests to the court for same-day audio release at 0 for 7 this term.

Years past had worked out better. Last term, C-SPAN requested nine cases, and the Court gave the go-ahead on two. In 2007-2008, eight requests resulted in three yesses. And in 2006-2007, C-SPAN asked for same-day audio release in seven cases, and the Supreme Court agreed to four.

As is its practice, the Supreme Court's denial of C-SPAN's request came with no explanation.

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New Media Sites in Iran Blur Lines Between Citizen Journo, Professional Journo, & Activist

In 2010, Newsweek declared Iran the “birthplace of citizen journalism.” Iranian bloggers were hailed by Westerners as “brave” for their coverage of the aftermath of the disputed 2009 election. A 40-second video of the death of Neda Agha-Soltan during an anti-government protest won a prestigious George Polk Award, the first anonymously-produced work to be so honored. And then came the 2013 study “Whither Blogestan,” which sought to explain Iran's shrinking blogosphere. Of nearly 25,000 highly active and connected blogs in 2008 and 2009, only 20 percent were still online in September 2013.

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