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Quarter of Young Online British Posted Election Commentary

BY Nancy Scola | Friday, May 7 2010

A YouGov survey of the British public commissioned by the phone company Orange has found that nearly a quarter of online respondents ages 18-to-24 (note the important qualifier) reported having commented on the election on Twitter, Facebook, or other social networks sites. That's compared to just 10% of the general pool of respondents of all ages who reported having done the same. Younger Britons included in the survey also expressed a high-level of interest in the election; 81% of that age group said that they had an interest in the campaign. Compare that to 77% of those ages 45-54 who said the same.

Those findings are come as part of a pre-release of a fuller study to be called "The Orange Digital Election Report" due out June 8th.

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