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The Program for the PdF Symposium on Wikileaks and Internet Freedom

BY Micah L. Sifry | Friday, December 10 2010

Saturday morning from 10am to 2pm, the Personal Democracy Forum (PdF) community is gathering to explore the impact of Wikileaks and ponder the future of internet freedom, at Riverpark in Manhattan (450 East 29th Street). Here's the plan for the day:

  • 9:30-10:00am: Registration and Coffee
  • 10:00-11:00am: Remarks by Mark Pesce, Esther Dyson, Jeff Jarvis, Rebecca MacKinnon, Jay Rosen, Carne Ross, Douglas Rushkoff, Katrin Verclas and Gideon Lichfield (moderated by Micah Sifry)
  • 11:00-11:45am: Open forum, moderated by Jeff "Oprah" Jarvis
  • 11:45-12:00pm: Break
  • 12:00pm-1:00pm: Remarks by Arianna Huffington, Charles Ferguson, Andrew Keen, Zeynep Tufekci, Tom Watson, Dave Winer, and Emily Bell (moderated by Andrew Rasiej)
  • 1:00-2:00pm: Open forum, moderated by Jeff "Donahue" Jarvis

Each of our speakers will have seven to eight minutes for their remarks, and we will do our best to allow for plenty of audience give-and-take.

Some background notes: It is not our intention to try to hammer out a common position on Wikileaks or internet freedom over the course of this symposium, but to explore some common questions together, with respect for each other's intelligence and sincerity. PdF is a crosspartisan forum devoted to examining the impact of technology on politics, government and society. This is obviously a hinge moment in that unfolding process.

In addition, this is not an attempt at a "balanced" debate, but rather an effort to give people from the fields of new and old media, technology, academia, politics, and policy, a place where we could start to think together about the meaning of current events. The presence or absence of particular speakers or points of view should not be taken as meaning anything more than the fact that some smart, engaged people were available on extremely short notice, and other smart, engaged people weren't.

The hashtag for the event is #pdfleaks. There will be coffee and light refreshments available.

To watch or listen to the symposium live, go to personaldemocracy.com/pdfleakslive starting Saturday morning at 10:00am Eastern.

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