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Palin's blogger ban is local

BY Nancy Scola | Wednesday, December 23 2009

What do you have to do to get banned from a Sarah Palin book signing? Snark on her from a close distance, it seems. Some of Palin's frequent home state critics found themselves blacklisted from attending a recent "Going Rouge" book event in Palin's hometown.

The Anchorage Daily News described the event at Curtis D. Menard Memorial Sports Center as feeling like a "homecoming" of sorts for Palin. But not welcome to gather around the Palin hearth, it seems, are some of the bigger names in the tiny Alaska blogosphere. Palin's banned blogger list, reports Gawker, included four fellow Alaskans: the Immoral Minority's Gryphen, Alaska Report's Dennis Zaki, Just a Girl from Homer's Shannyn Moore, and a mysterious fourth unknown blogger. A Wasilla official explained the ban by saying that organizers were simply attempting to keep the bloggers safe:

"At the end of the day, if something had gone wrong, it would have been my responsibility," [Wasilla Recreation and Cultural Services Manager James] Hastings said. "If I take three minutes on Google I can see that, given the nature of the people who were here, it wasn't in his (Zaki's) best interest to be here. He and others could have found themselves in a negative situation."

Gryphen, for one, tried not to take his former governor's rejection so hard:

It did not take more than a few minutes before I started to laugh uncontrollably at the absurdity of being banned from Sarah Palin's last book signing. She had not been able to stop us from continuing to write about her, she had not been able to keep us off of Elmendorf [Air Force Base], but by God she could damn well have us kicked out of the Curtis C. Menard Memorial Sports Center!

Yep that sure showed us.

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