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OrszBlog!

BY Nancy Scola | Friday, February 27 2009

Since handing off the Congressional Budget Office blogging conch to new director Doug Elmendorf, new Office of Management and Budget director Peter Orszag has been a man without a blog. No more. Ezra Klein reports and the White House Mystery Blogger™ confirms that Orszag will be blogging once again. During his OMB blogging days, Orszag liked to use the medium to highlight aspects of OMB scoring and other policy minutiae that the press might have glossed over. He seems to be taking the same approach to his new OMB blog spot, honing the narrative from inside his perch in the Executive Office of the President. He's using his second post to do some real-time pushback on the idea you see floating around in conservative circles that President Obama's new FY2010 budget includes "tax hikes during a recession."

A video of Orszag on the importance of blogging:

 

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