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The Obama White House's Full-Internet SOTU Press

BY Nancy Scola | Friday, January 21 2011

The Obama White House has rolled out a web page capturing all the online action they're leading around Tuesday's State of the Union address.

Oh, my friends. It's so much more than just President Obama doing a YouTube interview.

The White House blog has a new post, under the headline "The State of the Union and You," detailing the myriad ways one can do a little digital give and take with Administration officials around Tuesday night's State of the Union address.

On Tuesday itself, several advisors, aides, and assistants will be Open for Questions. On Wednesday, Press Secretary Robert Gibbs will, naturally be on Twitter.

At some point during the week, Vice President Joe Biden will be on Yahoo!

And continuing a practice we've seen the Obama administration engage in in the past, on Thursday, the 27th, several big-name administration officials will be mixing it up with online communities relevant to the policy areas in which they work.

The Council of Economic Advisors' Austan Goolsbee will be roundtabling with folks drawn from MSN Money, for example. Deputy National Security Advisor Denis McDonough is meant to connect with people from ForeignPolicy.com and Economist.com. For Arne Duncan, education secretary, it's mtvU, among others, and HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius is pulling from WebMD and Nurse.com.

As for the event itself, the White House has rolled out a web page a live video stream of the action, fun facts on State of the Union addresses gone by, and an infographic showing who's sitting in the First Lady's box. (Stay tuned. For now it's just empty chairs.)

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