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More Supporters Board The Suspended Cain Train

BY Sarah Lai Stirland | Friday, December 9 2011

Herman Cain has suspended his bid for the Republican presidential nomination, but his follower count keeps inching up online.

On Friday, Cain's web site listed 378, 157 "people on the Cain train." That's up a little bit from 377,610 on Tuesday, a few days after he quit the race (we've been tracking it.)

Perhaps they were looking for "TheCainSolutions.com," a web site that the former Godfather's Pizza CEO pointed everyone to when he made his suspension announcement on Saturday. He has said that he's going to continue to propose policy solutions, and post them there.

Whatever the case, it's worth keeping an eye on his online "assets" since he told Fox News Thursday evening that he's talked to two presidential candidates about endorsements.

As of last week, Hermancain.com was still the most visited of the Republican presidential campaign web sites with 19.35 percent of the traffic flowing to the Republican candidates' web sites, according to Hitwise. Newt.org dominated with 45 percent.

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