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Lieberman's Message to Tech Companies: Stay Away From Wikileaks

BY Micah L. Sifry | Wednesday, December 1 2010

Here's a little more detail on how Amazon came to kick Wikileaks off its servers. Yesterday, members of the staff of the Senate Homeland Security committee, which is chaired by Joe Lieberman (D-CT) (I-CT) saw a news article that mentioned that Wikileaks was hosted on Amazon's servers. "We called Amazon and asked a number of questions, said committee communications director Leslie Phillips, including, 'Are you aware that Wikileaks is using your servers,' and 'do you have any plans to take it down'?"

Today, she said, "Amazon called back and told us they'd taken Wikileaks down."

I asked her if the committee staff had been contacting other major tech companies that provide services to Wikileaks, such as Twitter or Facebook. Phillips said no such calls had been made, and that she wasn't aware of those companies providing hosting services to Wikileaks.

Nonetheless, she added, "Senator Lieberman hopes that what has transpired with Amazon will send a message to other companies. He believed Wikileaks has damaged national security and endangered lives."

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