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Joe Biden Literally Wants You to Use WhiteHouse.gov's New Tax Gadget

BY Nancy Scola | Monday, March 29 2010

Back during September's Gov 2.o Summit in DC, the White House's new media director Macon Phillips made an intriguing comment about how one thing he felt he needed to see in the months ahead was more traffic coming to the White House website "from inside the building." To put it into other words, the success of the Obama administration's increased attention on all things web and Internet would depend, in part, on whether the men and women that make up the Obama administration itself embraced its potential. A truly great, innovative, game-changing WhiteHouse.gov would serve as a resource for those toiling away inside the administration, making it easier to do their jobs and helping them to advance their political mission.

Which brings us to a note that just landed in email inboxes across the country this morning from the likes of Vice President Joe Biden. Last week we wrote up the new tax savings calculator that the White House put together some time ago. It's a savvy little widget. Input a few characteristics, and you have a personalized look at what the White House judges to be the tax implications of last year's Recovery Act. Now, it's one thing for the new media shop over in the Old Executive Office Building to cobble together a neat web calculator. But Biden's email is an embrace of that initiative at nearly the highest levels of the administration. Phillips' goal of getting those inside the executive branch to depend upon WhiteHouse.gov isn't hurt by the VP emailing out a note driving people to their news project.

We're not saying that Vice President Biden wrote the email. But it does use the Biden-ism "literally" in both the subject and very first sentence. So, maybe. Just, maybe. The full email from Joe Biden on WhiteHouse.gov's "Tax Savings Tool" is after the jump.

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