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How Much Was Spent Online in '06?

BY Michael Bassik | Wednesday, February 14 2007

MediaPost reported last November that online political ad spending hit $40 million according to PQ Media. And then today, The Wall Street Journal pointed to PQ Media in reporting that candidates, political parties and third-party groups will spend $80 million in online ads during the 2008 cycle.

The problem is, PQ Media’s numbers don’t gel with conventional wisdom and competitor data. Interviews with campaign strategists, estimates from TNS Media Intelligence/CMAG (download presentation), data from Nielsen’s AdRelevance (download description), and my personal knowledge as an online political advertising consultant peg online political advertising in 2006 at no more than $5 million.

How did PQ Media find eight-times more online political spending than everyone else? Perhaps they have a broader definition of online political spending. Or perhaps they were merely octuple-counting.

PQ Media: Help us out.

  • How did you arrive at your 2002, 2004, 2006, and 2008 numbers?
  • Will you share raw data and findings with techPresident?

    cc: info@pqmedia.com, pquinn@pqmedia.com, lkivijarv@pqmedia.com

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