Personal Democracy Plus Our premium content network. LEARN MORE You are not logged in. LOG IN NOW >

How Much Was Spent Online in '06?

BY Michael Bassik | Wednesday, February 14 2007

MediaPost reported last November that online political ad spending hit $40 million according to PQ Media. And then today, The Wall Street Journal pointed to PQ Media in reporting that candidates, political parties and third-party groups will spend $80 million in online ads during the 2008 cycle.

The problem is, PQ Media’s numbers don’t gel with conventional wisdom and competitor data. Interviews with campaign strategists, estimates from TNS Media Intelligence/CMAG (download presentation), data from Nielsen’s AdRelevance (download description), and my personal knowledge as an online political advertising consultant peg online political advertising in 2006 at no more than $5 million.

How did PQ Media find eight-times more online political spending than everyone else? Perhaps they have a broader definition of online political spending. Or perhaps they were merely octuple-counting.

PQ Media: Help us out.

  • How did you arrive at your 2002, 2004, 2006, and 2008 numbers?
  • Will you share raw data and findings with techPresident?

    cc: info@pqmedia.com, pquinn@pqmedia.com, lkivijarv@pqmedia.com

  • News Briefs

    RSS Feed thursday >

    Beyond @Congressedits, Capitol Hill Looks for Entry to Wikipedia

    As he recently told techPresident, the creator of Congressedits did not aim to make Members of Congress look bad, but said he hoped that they would recognize the importance of Wikipedia as a public space and engage more with its community. "If staffers and politicians identified as Wikipedians, that would be super. You could imagine politicians' home pages with a list of their recent edits, that they would be proud of the things that they are doing." On Capitol Hill, there is in fact interest in making that vision a reality, starting off with an initial conversation that could create a framework for more Wikipedians in Congress. GO

    wednesday >

    In the Philippines, Citizens Go Undercover With Bantay to Monitor Public Offices

    The Philippines, a country of almost 100 million, is considered among the most corrupt country in Southeast Asia, despite a boost in Transparency International's Corruption Perception Index in the past few years (from 134th in 2010 to 94th in 2013 out of 175.) Corruption involves all levels of government, but benefits also from a mindset of tolerance, says Happy Feraren, the co-founder of Bantay.ph, an anti-corruption educational initiative that teaches citizens how to monitor the quality of government services, sometimes by going undercover. GO

    More