Personal Democracy Plus Our premium content network. LEARN MORE You are not logged in. LOG IN NOW >

HealthCare.gov: Now with Numbers

BY Nancy Scola | Friday, October 1 2010

HealthCare.gov has been filled out with a first round of insurance plan pricing information, meeting an October 1st deadline set under the health care bill passed in March.

Praising the site as "manically consumer oriented," HHS CTO Todd Park said at a press conference today that the more than 200 insurance providers had handed over pricing data on about 4,400 different plans. Also asked of insurers: statistics on both what percentage of plan participants end up paying above the estimated plan price and what percentage of people who apply are rejected. Pricing data on more plans, said Park, will be rolled in month-by-month. As part of the upgrade, the site now features a comparison tool for plans, all aimed at making it giving consumers a similar experience shopping for an insurance plan as they have booking plane tickets on Expedia.

How do we know that the insurance plan prices that HealthCare.gov is listing are accurate ones? The check, reported Park, is the personal attestation of the insurers' CEO or CFO.

I should have more on this in a bit -- including some insight into why, if I put my personal data into HealthCare.gov, no plans pop up. But, thems are the basics, so that if folks are discussing this around the water cooler this afternoon, you won't feel left out. More from HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius here.

Past coverage: Obama's New HealthCare.gov: A Look at What's Inside, Hail to the HealthCare.gov Demo, The Cost of Adding Prices to HealthCare.gov, Putting Prices on Obama's Health Plan Site, and Health Care Reform: The Website.

News Briefs

RSS Feed thursday >

Beyond @Congressedits, Capitol Hill Looks for Entry to Wikipedia

As he recently told techPresident, the creator of Congressedits did not aim to make Members of Congress look bad, but said he hoped that they would recognize the importance of Wikipedia as a public space and engage more with its community. "If staffers and politicians identified as Wikipedians, that would be super. You could imagine politicians' home pages with a list of their recent edits, that they would be proud of the things that they are doing." On Capitol Hill, there is in fact interest in making that vision a reality, starting off with an initial conversation that could create a framework for more Wikipedians in Congress. GO

wednesday >

In the Philippines, Citizens Go Undercover With Bantay to Monitor Public Offices

The Philippines, a country of almost 100 million, is considered among the most corrupt country in Southeast Asia, despite a boost in Transparency International's Corruption Perception Index in the past few years (from 134th in 2010 to 94th in 2013 out of 175.) Corruption involves all levels of government, but benefits also from a mindset of tolerance, says Happy Feraren, the co-founder of Bantay.ph, an anti-corruption educational initiative that teaches citizens how to monitor the quality of government services, sometimes by going undercover. GO

More