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Goolsbee's Back at the White Board to Explain the Art of the Deal

BY Nancy Scola | Thursday, December 9 2010

Austan Goolsbee is back in his role as presidential educator in this latest installment in the Obama White House's "White Board" video series, wherein administration officials (though, generally, it's been the engaging Goolsbee, chair of the Council of Economic Advisers) pick up a marker and attempt to explain complicated public policy topics in just a few minutes. Today's subject? Why President Obama agreed to a two-year extension of the Bush tax cuts, move that has drawn heated protest from some on the left. Goolsbee's argument breaks down to the notion that there was simply too much at stake not to make a deal, from unemployment insurance to tax breaks for parents with kids in college.

Give a watch to the four minute video to get a sense of how the Obama White House is trying to break through the cacophony of the new environment of today by going for simple and straightforward.

(By the way, it finally occurred to me this morning, with this sixth White Board episode, what the Obama White House video series had subconsciously been reminding me of: Bill Cosby's Picture Pages!)

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