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First POST: Redirection

BY Nick Judd | Thursday, November 10 2011

  • The Perry campaign's response to their candidate, Texas Gov. Rick Perry, making an embarrassing and possibly campaign-ending gaffe during a nationally televised presidential debate? An email to supporters that begins:

    We’ve all had human moments. President Obama is still trying to find all 57 states. Ronald Reagan got lost somewhere on the Pacific Highway in an answer to a debate question. Gerald Ford ate a tamale without removing the husk. And tonight Rick Perry forgot the third agency he wants to eliminate. Just goes to show there are too damn many federal agencies.

    The governor said it best afterwards: “I’m glad I had my boots on, because I sure stepped in it tonight.”

  • Number of times the Internet was mentioned in last night's debate, CNBC's "Your Money, Your Vote" Republican presidential debate: 0. "Innovators" were mentioned once, by former Sen. Rick Santorum, after former House Speaker Newt Gingrich invoked Henry Ford and Bill Gates. Follow the link for a transcript.

  • You know who is talking about the Internet? Sen. Marco Rubio, Gautham Nagesh reports. The Federal Communications Commission's net neutrality regulations were up for debate Wednesday on Capitol Hill; click through for more from Nagesh.

  • Jennifer Preston at the New York Times catches Herman Cain trying to flip the script on the sexual misconduct allegations against him, with the help of Google search ads.

  • In response to H.R. 3261, legislation introduced late last month that would allow the Justice Department to demand search engines and other sites block access to sites it determines to be dedicated to copyright infringement, several groups plan to block their own websites with splash pages in the style of a Department of Justice takedown page, per a release from the website Fight for the Future. The Electronic Frontier Foundation, Public Knowledge, Demand Progress, and the Free Software Foundation are among the participants, according to the release.

  • Among the White House's SAVE award finalists — who may win the SAVE Award, issued annually to the federal employee who comes up with the best idea to save money and cut wasteful spending — are two suggestions that involve reading more online and doing less in print.

  • Goverment Technology Magazine covers a new turn of events in Lancaster, Calif.:

    The Lancaster City Council approved on Tuesday evening, Nov. 8, a proposal to add an aerial law enforcement surveillance system to its crime fighting toolbox. Called the Law Enforcement Aerial Platform System (LEAPS), the video technology sits on a small plane and can follow a suspect or target from 1,000 to 3,000 feet above the ground.

    Police in the UK and in France have already experimented with unmanned aerial vehicles in law enforcement. From Afghanistan to your backyard!

  • Rick Hasen remains skeptical of Americans Elect, the Internet-powered group seeking a radically centrist candidate for 2012. Micah Sifry took a deep look at Americans Elect here.

  • All that money to be saved by the federal government, in large part through what the White House frames as more prudent technology deployment, will largely go to other programs rather than paying down the deficit.

News Briefs

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NYC Open Data Advocates Focus on Quality And Value Over Quantity

The New York City Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications plans to publish more than double the amount of datasets this year than it published to the portal last year, new Commissioner Anne Roest wrote last week in an annual report mandated by the city's open data law, with 135 datasets scheduled to be released this year, and almost 100 more to come in 2015. But as preparations are underway for City Council open data oversight hearings in the fall, what matters more to advocates than the absolute number of the datasets is their quality. GO

Civic Tech and Engagement: Announcing a New Series on What Makes it "Thick"

Announcing a new series of feature articles that we will be publishing over the next several months, thanks to the support of the Rita Allen Foundation. Our focus is on digitally-enabled civic engagement, and in particular, how and under what conditions "thick" digital civic engagement occurs. What we're after is answers to this question: When does a tech tool or platform enable actual people to make ongoing and significant contributions to each other, to a place or cause, at a scale that produces demonstrable change? GO

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