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First POST: Makeup

BY Nick Judd | Tuesday, October 25 2011

  • Halloween-themed ad season has begun with this anti-super-PAC one from Common Cause.

  • Fighting back online against President Barack Obama's new "we can't wait line" — can't wait, that is, for Congress to take action on the economy — Republican House Speaker John Boehner's staff has posted to the web a palm card that House GOP leaders are circulating around the Hill. The card lists 15 House-passed bills that have not made it through the Democrat-led Senate.

  • Meanwhile, National Economic Council Deputy Director Brian Deese will take questions on Twitter about the "we can't wait" slogan and Obama's jobs plans.

  • More trouble for Secure Socket Layer, the technology that secures everything from your bank transactions to your Twitter login, as Kim Zetter reports on Wired's Threat Level blog on a new attack that makes use of flaws in SSL to take down sites accepting SSL connections.

  • After YouTube videos featuring cowboys, country music and the candidate himself singing over footage of the second plane hitting the World Trade Center, presidential hopeful Herman Cain is out today with a new video in which his top adviser, Mark Block, smokes a cigarette while talking about his boss. Politico's Alexander Burns has more. Note that the video is unlisted — as of right now, Cain's regular viewers won't see it, only people who have the link or spot it embedded around the web.

  • Teaparty.com may soon be up for sale.

  • Facebook's D.C. outfit gets a new face, Politico's Tony Romm reports — Chris Herndon, late of a post as Republican counsel to the Senate Commerce Committee.

  • The Congressional Management Foundation has named its winners of this year's Gold Mouse Awards. Among the standouts: Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.), Sen. Mark Begich (D-Alaska), House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and, for the best committee website, Education and Workforce Chairman Rep. John Kline (R-Minn.).

  • A staffing shake-up at Gov. Rick Perry's presidential campaign includes changes to his media strategy team, the New York Times reports.

(With Micah Sifry)