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First POST: Gearing Up

BY Nick Judd | Friday, October 7 2011

  • The Obama 2012 campaign looks to be reactivating its YouTube channel.

  • Neal Ungerleider breaks down the power structure of Zuccotti Park's "leaderless" protesters.
  • Occupy Wall Street as historic moment: the protest gets a Wikipedia page.

  • Here are Naomi Klein's prepared remarks from her visit there Thursday.

  • And Anne-Marie Slaughter in the New York Times yesterday:

    In the past month, it has been odd to read Twitter and blog posts from the Middle East taking the Wall Street protests far more seriously than anyone here has. My reflexive response was to explain that they didn’t understand our politics; after all, that is so often what citizens of other countries tell Americans when we opine oh-so-knowingly about their politics.

    But in this case, I am beginning to suspect that people abroad with long experience of disenfranchisement and trampling of their dignity may in fact understand the fissures in our society better than we do ourselves.

  • Lead of a New York Times story on an order to revise computer security rules: "The White House plans to issue an executive order on Friday to replace a flawed patchwork of computer security safeguards exposed by the disclosure of hundreds of thousands of classified government documents to WikiLeaks last year."

  • Remember those new Federal Election Commission rules for Internet politicking? Rick Hasen notes they're moving forward, and likely to take effect after 2012.

  • The federal government says "to the cloud" is on the cheap, announcing Thursday that it expects to save about $5 billion on consolidating federal data centers.

  • The DATA Act, a bill that would reinvent the way the federal government reports its spending, makes progress on Capitol Hill.

  • Danielle Gould writes that new startups are changing the food system:

    How do you re-imagine the architecture of the food supply chain when its blueprints are locked up in proprietary databases?

    Statups. A growing number of startups such as Real Time Farms and Foodtree are hacking the system to meet people’s growing demand for more information about who and how their food is produced. They are crowdsourcing previously unavailable data and packaging it in a format that helps consumers make more informed food choices.

  • Mark Headd of Tropo has a roundup of resources for civic hackers, including pointers to a new video series from Reno's Kristy Fifelsky on how to host a civic hackathon.

News Briefs

RSS Feed friday >

First POST: MonopSony

Debating whether the Sony hack is a national security issue; living in the Age of Outrage; how Black Twitter is changing the civil rights scene; and much, much more. GO

tuesday >

First POST: Company

The global "Snowden effect" is huge; how many consumer-facing online services fail the user privacy test; the Dems' 2016 digital to-do list; and much, much more. GO

monday >

First POST: Mood Slime

The Sony email leak reveals the MPAA's campaign against Google; how Uber is lobbying in local markets; mapping the #MillionsMarchNYC; and much, much more. GO

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