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DNC Wants Many Eyes on the GOP

BY Nancy Scola | Tuesday, June 29 2010


The Democratic National Committee is calling for help in documenting Republican missteps, misstatements, and bad behavior, with a new effort they're calling The Accountability Project.

The Democratic Party says the site -- online at accountabilityproject.com -- is "a platform for you to hold candidates accountable for their claims, their public statements, and their campaign tactics." Supporters can upload video, photos, fliers, emails, audio recordings and more, so that, says party, "candidates see that there's a cost for their dishonesty."

The iconic did-he-really-say-that? moments made possible by the Internet is, of course, former Virginia Senator George Allen's "macaca" incident. But The Accountability Project is of a piece with other, more structured efforts to use technology to pull what happens in campaign shadows and back roads stops into the light of day, like the recent effort by the Guardian to pull readers into tracking what the Tory campaign looked like throughout the UK and the Obama White House's own effort to expose malicious and misleading emails circulating around the web.

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NYC Open Data Advocates Focus on Quality And Value Over Quantity

The New York City Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications plans to publish more than double the amount of datasets this year than it published to the portal last year, new Commissioner Anne Roest wrote last week in an annual report mandated by the city's open data law, with 135 datasets scheduled to be released this year, and almost 100 more to come in 2015. But as preparations are underway for City Council open data oversight hearings in the fall, what matters more to advocates than the absolute number of the datasets is their quality. GO

Civic Tech and Engagement: Announcing a New Series on What Makes it "Thick"

Announcing a new series of feature articles that we will be publishing over the next several months, thanks to the support of the Rita Allen Foundation. Our focus is on digitally-enabled civic engagement, and in particular, how and under what conditions "thick" digital civic engagement occurs. What we're after is answers to this question: When does a tech tool or platform enable actual people to make ongoing and significant contributions to each other, to a place or cause, at a scale that produces demonstrable change? GO

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