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Dealing with the Disaster of Online Critique

BY Nancy Scola | Friday, August 20 2010

Posted on Flickr by Jeremiah Owyang

Pew Internet Project Director Lee Raine tweets out a pointer to the above 2008 chart from the United States Air Force's Public Affairs Agency. It lays out the Air Force's "Blog Assessment" strategy for responding to online postings about themselves, and at least one digital strategist today is using it to help her clients figure out how to navigate the online space.

One point that jumps out from the chart, one that helps us understand how some big entities see the wild world of online commentary: the options for what to do when you discover a less than "positive" online posting about your organization is to determine whether its the work of a troll, an angry or snarky ranter, someone posting erroneous facts, or someone who had a negative experience with someone inside the organization. Nowhere is the option for someone having a legitimate critique or complaint.

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