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Daou's Triangle, Now Housed on techPresident

BY Nancy Scola | Monday, February 9 2009

Back in 2005, former Kerry campaign staffer Peter Daou wrote what became a seminal essay on the interaction between the blossoming blogosphere, the political establishment, and the press. Called "THE TRIANGLE: Limits of Blog Power," Peter's piece was an a-ha moment for many of us, suddenly clarifying the nascent power relationships being created by this new blogging medium. But Peter's piece, originally run on his Salon.com Daou Report site, has been nearly impossible to find online in recent years without resorting to the Wayback Machine. That's why we're thrilled to repost the essay here on techPresident, with Peter's kind permission. Enjoy.

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