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Barack Obama's Playbook

BY Nancy Scola | Tuesday, July 20 2010

With an awareness of just how busy everyone is these days, the White House is launching topical weekly email updates:

Don’t have time to check WH.gov everyday?  That’s ok – we’ve got a new feature to make staying current even easier. Starting today, the White House will offer a brand new weekly email with updates and latest news on the economy and job creation in America.  Each week, we’ll send you the latest economy and jobs related posts from the White House blog as well as a look ahead to what’s on tap for next week. 

You can check out the first edition of the Economy and Jobs Agenda below and sign up to get the weekly updates in your inbox here.  We'll also launch a Energy and Climate Agenda later this week - sign up now.  Look for more topics coming soon.

The first missive in the Economy and Jobs series is fairly dry, if informative, stuff, and the White House is promising that future installments will include the answer to one "reader question" per week. The "What's Ahead" feature is also a nice touch. While we're on the topic of email newsletters, anyone else notice that the thing to do these days (see Wonkbook, Morning Tech) is to include goofy little random bits from around the web, like links to strange YouTube videos or funny off-topic blog posts? Probably best for the White House to avoid that, but it's interesting to see how the norms of this kind of digital "literature" are developing.

Anyway, here's where you go to sign up for the new White House newsletters.

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