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WeGov

Surveillance in the Overlooked Corners of Africa

BY Jessica McKenzie | Tuesday, March 4 2014

Screenshot of Appelbaum and Marques

In the video below, filmed during the Oslo Freedom Forum in May 2013, Jacob Appelbaum breaks it to Rafael Marques, an Angolan investigative journalist and anti-corruption activist, that his laptop is being surveilled through a crude backdoor in spite of the fact that he is using Tor. He opens up a file where they can see all the images that have been stored and are waiting to be collected by the hackers. Appelbaum tells an understandably concerned Marques: “Every computer that's targeted is compromisable,”

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WeGov

In Zambia, Power Struggle Between Gov't And Watchdog Escalates

BY Jessica McKenzie | Monday, January 20 2014

The Zambian government has just about had it with the independent, anonymous news site Zambian Watchdog. Their most recent offense? Publishing a draft constitution never before seen by the public. Mere hours after publication, Zambian authorities stated that they will pursue those responsible for “libelous, defamatory, treasonous and seditious statements and bring them to book.”

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WeGov

Assault On Independent Media Site in Zambia Ends In Humiliation For Junior Minister

BY Jessica McKenzie | Monday, January 13 2014

After beginning a highly personal war on the independent, anonymous news site Zambian Watchdog, Zambia's Junior Minister of Commerce, Trade and Industry Miles Sampa suffered numerous blows to his image, and finally backed down from the assault, tail tucked firmly between his legs. It is a prominent victory for the feisty Watchdog, which has endured assaults from the Zambian authorities before.

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First POST: Broken Heroes

BY Micah L. Sifry | Thursday, January 9 2014

Chris Christie's political career threatened by a traffic scandal of his staff's own making; Cory Doctorow and Albert Wenger fear that 2014 may be the year we lose the open web; Upworthy shares what was most shared in 2013; and much, much more. Read More

WeGov

Social Change Is What Happens When You're Busy Making Other Plans

BY Jessica McKenzie | Tuesday, November 19 2013

Cover image courtesy of Ken Banks

During his time as a fellow at Stanford University in 2007, Ken Banks noticed a growing number of students going to school to study social innovation and social entrepreneurship. “Then they leave the gates of the building and go 'Right, what can I fix?'”

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WeGov

Nigeria's Push to Legalize Wiretapping and Internet Surveillance Will Likely Succeed

BY Jessica McKenzie | Monday, November 18 2013

Normalizing surveillance under guise of safety (Flickr/abrinsky)

It seems as though Nigeria is using scare tactics to push through an Orwellian bill legalizing an extensive surveillance system. The proposed wiretap program would allow law enforcement and security agencies to monitor and track both phone and Internet communications.

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WeGov

Will The Shift To E-Gov't Decrease Corruption in Kenya?

BY Jessica McKenzie | Thursday, November 7 2013

"Complaint box for corruption." (Flickr/watchsmart)

Today Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta launched the first e-government service center in Nairobi. The Huduma—which is Swahili for service—Centers are supposed to be “one-stop shop[s]” for government services like seasonal parking tickets, student loan applications, reporting corruption and drivers licenses, among others.

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WeGov

Rwandapedia: Their Story, Their Way

BY Jessica McKenzie | Thursday, November 7 2013

Rwandan Flag (Wikipedia)

Last week at the Transform Africa Summit, a conference centered on development and ICT, Rwanda launched a digital archive called Rwandapedia, a collection of cultural and historical information about the country. The site as it is now focuses on the past 20 years, after the genocide in 1994. However, much like the online encyclopedia Wikipedia, Rwandapedia is a platform through which anyone can submit stories and material, and will eventually encompass a much deeper history.

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WeGov

Piggybacking on Corporations to Distribute Humanitarian Aid

BY Jessica McKenzie | Wednesday, November 6 2013

The ubiquitous Coca-Cola logo (Wikipedia)

Why is it that you can by a Coke nearly everywhere in the world, even in the most remote developing country, but in many of those same locations one in nine children die from preventable illnesses like dehydration from diarrhea before their fifth birthday? That was what the founders of the organization ColaLife wondered when they came up with the idea for Kit Yamoyo, an anti-dehydration kit that piggybacks on existing Coca-Cola distribution networks to get the solution to those in need.

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WeGov

Tell President Kenyatta You Paid A Bribe

BY Jessica McKenzie | Thursday, October 31 2013

125,584,332 Kenyan shillings have been paid in bribes since the end of 2011 (Wikipedia)

As Kenya continues to struggle with everyday corruption, President Kenyatta has launched a platform through which citizens can report incidents of bribery directly to his administration. Similar platforms, like I Paid A Bribe and Not In My Country, which targets corruption in the school system, already exist, but bribery is so systemic that only seven out of 100 Kenyans will report specific instances, according to Transparency International's most recent East African Bribery Index. It remains to be seen if President Kenyatta's attention to the problem will inspire more participation and eventually lead to reform and change.

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