You are not logged in. LOG IN NOW >

Rethinking Government Services Online

BY David Eaves | Tuesday, November 6 2012

Governments have been talking about how they will deliver services online for over two decades. (Anyone up for some e-government?) The sad truth is, at the national level, few users of online government services believe governments have succeeded - most citizens' experience with government websites are marked with frustration, a sense of loathing, and pretty much the opposite of whatever we imagined e-government would be. But there are three reasons why I waded through not one, but three lengthy UK reports about its vision, and now believe that if you care about government services online or better still, advise a government, there are some things worth knowing about the UK's new Digital Government Strategy. Read More


In Zambia, a Phone App Allows Citizens to Participate in Drafting Their Constitution

BY Lisa Goldman | Friday, November 2 2012

Screenshot from phone app page.

Zambia is in the process of writing a constitution that will reflect the aspiration of the people. In order to make the process inclusive, the government has created a phone app that allows people to read the draft, sharing and commenting on pages. The Zambian draft constitution app is available free for download on Google Play — but not on iTunes, which shows the extent to which low-cost Androids are kicking dust in the face of the prohibitively priced iPhone in developing nations. Read More


Watch Australian Dept of Justice Explain its Social Media Policy in Three Minutes

BY Lisa Goldman | Wednesday, October 24 2012

Screenshot from Department of Justice video.

The Department of Justice for Victoria, Australia, created a 3-minute video that explains cogently, in simple terms that do not patronize, what social media is and the steps an employee of the department must take in order to use it responsibly. Read More


Getting it Right:

BY David Eaves | Monday, October 22 2012

For possibly the first time in my life, I’m actually excited about a national government website. It would appear that in the United Kingdom, the designers, the developers and the content creators of a government have finally beaten the managers. And the result? Not only is it stunning, but it actually stands to be compared against the websites that citizens regularly use. Citizens will compare government websites not to one another but to sites like Google or Facebook, and easily stands up to that comparison. Read More


Lawyer for Hacktivists: U.S. Law Criminalizing Cyberattacks Should Be Modified

BY Lisa Goldman | Monday, October 8 2012

Jay Leiderman, the California based attorney who represents notorious hacktivists like Anonymous, spoke to the Atlantic about why he represents some of his clients pro bono, why he thinks the law criminalizing DDoS (Distributed Denial of Service Attacks) should be modified and why he once described certain variations of this type of "cyberattack" as "the equivalent of occupying the Woolworth's lunch counter during the civil rights movement." Read More


Indonesian Grassroots Group Promotes Internet Freedom

BY Lisa Goldman | Friday, October 5 2012

With the increase in around the region of government legislation that would limit online freedom of expression, Indonesian bloggers have formed an organization to raise awareness and possibly fight back. Read More


Putin Expels USAID; Organization Contributed to Russian NGO that Mapped Electoral Balloting Irregularities

BY Natalia Antonova | Friday, October 5 2012

Screenshot from the Golos election mapping site

The Russian government booted USAID out of the country following accusations that the well known aid agency had been "meddling in internal affairs," as Vladimir Putin put it. He was referring to Golos, a group that mapped balloting fraud in the Russian election. A Russian journalist provides the background and some valuable insight into the circumstances surrounding this incident. Read More


Vietnamese Dissident Bloggers Handed Heavy Jail Sentences

BY Lisa Goldman | Monday, September 24 2012

Vietnam has sentenced three dissident political bloggers to harsh jail sentences, reports Reporters Without Borders. Read More

Cameras Come to Quincy's Court

BY Nancy Scola | Tuesday, May 3 2011

Neiman Lab profiles OpenCourt, a new Knight News Challenge-funded project that sets up daily livestreaming of Massachusetts' Quincy District Court. Read More

New Paper: To What Do We Owe Judicial Ludditism?

BY Nancy Scola | Tuesday, April 19 2011

Evgeny Morozov points us to a juicy new Cornell Law School working paper that one looks forward to reading on why courts have lagged behind the public sector and other government branches in embracing technology: Judged ... Read More